Husband: Edmund Stevens (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
Born: 09 Apr 1871 in Lake Mills, Nova Scotia, Canada (10)
Married: 09 Jun 1899 in Brodhead, Green Co., WI (41)
Died: 10 Apr 1926 in Footville, WI (11)
Father: Charles Stevens
Mother: Catherine Patriquin
Spouses:
Wife: Flora Lulu Balis (12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19)
Born: 07 Jul 1876 in Brodhead, Green Co, WI (20 21)
Died: 08 Aug 1951 in Waukegan, Lake, IL
Father: John Charles Balis
Mother: Mary Lorinda Derrick
Spouses:
Children
01 (F): Kathryn Harriet Stevens (22 23 24 25)
Born: 24 Oct 1900 in Brodhead, WI
Died: 30 Mar 1980 in Sun City, AZ
Spouses: Arthur I Blanchard
02 (M): Paul Derrick Stevens (26 27 28 29 30 31)
Born: 08 May 1902 in Brodhead, green, WI
Died: 08 Mar 1986 in Shoshone, Lincoln, Idaho (32 33)
Spouses: Dorothy Schlink
03 (M): Harold Balis Stevens (34 35 36 37 38 39 40)
Born: 25 Aug 1908 in Redfield, Spink, South Dakota
Died: 05 Jun 1955 in Chicago, Cook, IL
Spouses: Helen Frances White
Additional Information

Edmund Stevens:

Buried: Greenwood Cemetery, Brodhead, WI

Notes:

The Edmund Stevens Story
April 6, 2009

Dear Children,

Tonight I will tell you the story of your grandfather's grandfather. That would make him your great great grandfather.

Edmund Stevens was the 4th child of Charles and Catherine Stevens. He was born April 9, 1872 in Lake Mills, Nova Scotia, Canada. He moved to Wisconsin with his family about 1880 when he was 8 years old. Most likely they came to this part of Wisconsin because Edmund's mother's brother, John Patriquin, had settled here. First they lived in a little town called Orfordville. The next year they moved closer to Brodhead.

In 1899 Edmund married Flora Balis who had grown up in Brodhead with her Derrick grandparents. First they had a daughter, Kathryn in 1900, and then a son, Paul in 1902. While Flora was pregnant with Paul, her sister Hettie came to stay and help with the work. Hettie wrote in her journal about her stay with the young Stevens family. You can read about it in Flora's story. My, there was a lot of work to do. They were living on a farm near Brodhead. There were cows to milk, chickens to feed, water to be carried, gardening, washing, ironing, baking, and churning to be done. Life was not easy 100 years ago. In 1908 when Flora was expecting her third child, our ancestor Harold, Edmund and Flora decided to homestead in South Dakota, so they took off in a covered wagon for the South Dakota prairie and settled in Spink County, near the town of Redfield. They lived in a sod house just as Flora had as a child. That's where Harold was born. We don't know much about their life in South Dakota., but it probably didn't go too well. The 1910 census shows them living in Iowa. So after only two years they were already working their way back to beautiful green Wisconsin. In 1914 they came back for good.

For several years Ed farmed near Brodhead, raising tobacco among other things. Then the family moved to nearby Footville into the old Snyder homestead across the street from the school. Ed opened a blacksmith shop behind the house and earned a living at the blacksmith trade in which he had also engaged as a younger man. The earlier 1900 census listed his occupation as “blacksmith.” Even today horseshoes are being dug up around the area where the blacksmith shop was. We have one of them brought by Ed's great-nephew, Richard Nyman. Ed was known to be a tender hearted soul who wouldn't press people to pay their bills if he knew they were experiencing hard times. And so, Flora took in roomers, mostly teachers from the school across the street, to help buy groceries.

Ed was involved in all the civic affairs of his community. The organizations he belonged to as listed in his obituary are Odd Fellows of Footville, Methodist Episcopal Church of Brodhead, Woodmen of the World, Equity Fraternal Union, Commercial Club and the Fire Department.

While they were living in Footville there was a terrible measles epidemic. Ed became very ill and soon afterwards developed Leukemia. He died of Leukemia in 1926 on the day after his 54th birthday..

Edmund and Flora's first child, Kathryn Harriet Stevens, married Arthur Blanchard in 1936. They never had any children of their own but were a wonderful aunt and uncle to your grandfather and his sister Lois. Before she married, Kathryn taught school in Lodi, Wisconsin, and Waukegan, Illinois. It was because Kathryn had a teaching job in Waukegan that her mother and brother Harold moved there in 1929, a move which had tremendous implications for your coming into the world. After her marriage to Arthur, they moved to Oak Park, Illinois. Kathryn worked in the book department of Marshall Fields in Oak Park for many years. We have a lovely set of art books that she bought for us while working there. Aunt Kathryn was a meticulous housekeeper. When I was a young bride the family had me spooked about her visits to us because of her legendary housekeeping. But she was not at all critical. She was a lovely kind woman that was delighted with my interest in the family's history. She passed on to us a plate that had belonged to her grandmother, Mary Derrick. Her husband Arthur was a skilled cabinet maker. We have a white kitchen cupboard he made. When our children were small he made them a sweet little table and chairs set. After Kathryn and Arthur retired they moved back to Brodhead, Wisconsin where they had a lovely home that backed up to the Sugar River. In the late 1960's Kathryn and Arthur moved to a retirement community in Sun City, Arizona. Several years later Kathryn developed dementia and went to live in a nursing home until her death in 1980. Arthur died 6 years later. He had moved to Washington state by that time.

Edmund and Flora's second child, Paul Derrick Stevens, grew up and married Dorothy Schlink. He and Dorothy went out to Idaho where Paul had several uncles (Edmund's brothers) and Paul became a potato farmer. He and Dorothy had four children, Rosemary, Edmund, Harold, and Lonabelle. Isn't that neat? The two brothers, Paul and Harold, each named a son after the other. Paul Derrick Stevens named his son Harold, and Harold Balis Stevens named his son Paul Robert. I never met Uncle Paul and Aunt Dorothy, but they sent us a set of tableware when we married. I think they must have been very much in love. They look so sweet together in their pictures. Paul died in March of 1986 and Dorothy only lived two months afterwards, dying in June 1986.

Harold Balis Stevens, Edmund and Flora's third child is our ancestor and he has his own story.

We can be very proud of our ancestor Edmund Stevens. He came as a child immigrant from Canada. He learned a good trade as a blacksmith and also was a farmer. He went west in a covered wagon and homesteaded in South Dakota. He came back to Footville, Wisconsin where he was known as a kind-hearted pillar of the community. He was a good husband and father, but died much too young and never got to know his grandchildren. So Hooray for Edmund Stevens!

Here's how you are related to Edmund: Edmund and Flora had Harold Stevens, Harold and Helen had Paul Stevens, Paul and Dianne had Dawne Stevens, Dawne married Jason Pamplin and had ...my four wonderful grandbabies!

Love,
Granny

Flora Lulu Balis:

Cause of Death: heart failure

Buried: Greenwood Cemetery, Brodhead, WI

Notes:

April 13, 2004

Dear Children,

Tonight I want to tell you
The Flora Balis Story

She was your Grandpa's Grandma and he knew her. Flora Lulu Balis was the 3rd child of John and Mary Derrick Balis. She entered the world on July the 7th of 1876. The family was living in the community called Clarence, which was near the present day Brodhead in Green County, Wisconsin. Flora joined her two older brothers, Frank and Robert. Two years later a baby sister, Hettie, was born. Here is how Mary described her little daughter, Flora, in a letter to Belle Moore Derrick, wife of Mary's brother, Frank. " Skippie (Flora) is such a fat strong little Dutch woman. She is good as gold. " Flora was about 9 when her mother wrote those words.

We don't have any other words that her mother wrote about Flora. Nor do we have words that Flora wrote herself. We do, however, have two wonderful journals written by her next younger sister, Hettie, in which she describes many childhood experiences shared with Flora. The parts with quotation marks (''...") around them are from Hettie's Journal. You can imagine it's Flora speaking because she experienced the very same things. The words inside Parentheses ( ) are my additions (Granny).

"In May of 1879...they (our parents, John and Mary Balis) decided to migrate to Nebraska and homestead...Folks usually tried to homestead near a stream with some shrubs and small trees on account of fuel and water. On their way to Nebraska in a covered wagon... they stopped at Mary and Henry Reasoner's in Iowa. She was father's cousin. They got their washing all done up and replenished their supplies. They went on from there to Orleans, Nebraska close to the Kansas line. It was just across the Republican River. They homesteaded 10 miles, I think it was, north-east of Orleans close to a creek." (Flora was not yet three years old at the time of this trip.)

"They first dug a dugout back in a bank or hill. They roofed it over with poles from wild plum trees and choke cherries (from) along the creek. Then they plowed large thick (clumps of) sod and laid it over (the poles). Over that they put clay dirt... I still remember having pans set on the dirt floor to catch the leaking spots. The dugout was just one big room. Of course lumber was very high (probably, non-existent). Our floor was just the dirt. It finally got hard and smooth. "

(You might wonder why little Flora, would have to live in a hole in the ground. That's what a dugout was, a hole, or cave dug into the side of a hill or river bank. When pioneers got to where they were going, if they were among the first settlers, there were no hotels or motels. There were no stores. Often there were no neighbors to stay with til you got your own place up. Shelter, constructing a home, was usually the first order of business. If you were moving to an area with lots of trees, you could make a log cabin. Harlan County, Nebraska did not have a lot of trees. In fact it had practically no trees. In this area and other parts of the great American prairie a dugout was the quickest and easiest shelter that could be built in a few days. A room was dug from the side of a hill and the opening closed in by whatever was avaitable, often the wagon's cover. This type of shelter also had problems. For one, they leaked. Not only water, but also mosquitos and small animals could get in.)

"After that they built a better larger dugout and took the first one over for a chicken house. (They) also built a barn the same way. I can remember living in the second one but not the first one. Mabel was born in the second dugout and I don't know but Ernie was too. (Flora's sister Mable was born in 1880, and Brother Ernie in 1882.) (First we) lived on the homestead in a small dugout, then in a larger one, and finally they built a good sized sod house. I can remember quite well when they built the sod house. It's quite an improvement over a dugout..."

(To understand what a sod house is, you first have to understand a little bit about prairie plants. Prairie plants have thick deep roots. It is very difficult to plow prairie soil because of these tough roots. You can cut a block about a foot deep out of the prairie soil and it will stay altogether almost like a brick. And that's how the prairie settlers used it. They cut blocks out of the top layer of soil, called turf, and used the blocks just like you would bricks to build a house.)

" Two very troublesome things mother had to fight were fleas and bedbugs. They seemed to even be in the soil. We would have to take the bedsteads all apart and pour boiling water all over them. I guess they did not have bug killers in those days. We were not bothered by them after we moved into town and the frame (wooden) house."

"The folks from Wisconsin sent different kinds of berry plants and trees. Mother and father had a big garden down near the creek, as sometimes they had to water some things. They plowed their fields so each side of the property was protected from prairie fires that sometimes came sweeping across the plains." ( Why do you think a plowed field would protect against prairie fires?) "Father put down a well and had the first windmill I ever saw." (One problem the prairie pioneers faced was water. Rainfall can be extremely unpredictable on the American plains. But, with no forests to break it for a thousand miles, the wind is very predictable. A windmill was used to pump well water that saved the farm in times of drought.)

"Brothers Frank and Bob would herd the cattle, mostly cows and young stock, on the range bare footed. There was lots of cactus and rattlers but we were all quite lucky. The boys as they got a little older would (grow) pop corn (and) would have as much as a barrel of ears of pop corn. We raised sugar cane and would have a barrel of molasses. (We'd also have) a barrel of salt pickles. Just cucumbers salted down were not pickles till they were soaked out and put in vinegar and spices. But us kids loved to eat the salty ones sometimes. We would also have a barrel of sauerkraut, and potatoes and some vegetables all in the cave."

"Father always had hogs to butcher, also beef at times. But then they had not learned how to can beef or pork or vegetables. Pork, one could salt and smoke and keep it for some time. And lard would never spoil. But I have read letters my mother wrote to relatives in Wisconsin saying Father had been down on the creek and had cut a load of wood to haul to Holdridge, 15 miles away, to trade for groceries." (So there were at least SOME trees around. I think Hettie means that although they grew and raised most of their food, they were not totally self-sufficient.)

(Hettie tells about a number of experiences she remembered from Childhood that would have been experienced by Flora as well.) "Grandpa and Grandma Balis lived in a location where they raised apples and would send one or two barrels of apples. They were sure good." (Grandpa and Grandma Balis, Thomas Jefferson and Mary Ewers Balis, homesteaded about the same time as did John and Mary and their family.) And we always stood at mother's knee, each one waiting for our peeling, as she pared them for cooking. Twas always customary to eat the ones with a bad spot on them, of course, first."

"I remember Sister Flo and I washed the dishes...We used two chairs, one with a dish pan on it and one with a pan of rinsing water. I wiped and could just reach to get them on the table. We always took the chairs which were just plain wooden chairs outside when the weather was nice on Saturday and wash them."

"For fuel... two of us would take a bushel basket and start out and pick up cow chips if they were dry or turn the damp ones over for next time. (We) would also pick up buffalo bones or anything that would burn." (Remember, where Flora's family lived there were very few trees. There was no electricity. There were no natural gas lines. How could they cook their food or keep their house warm in the winter? They had to have fuel. Do you know what cow chips are? They are big blobs of cow poop. When it dries out it can be burned. It's hard for me to understand how they could get enough cow chips to keep the house warm all winter. It can get very cold and snowy in Nebraska.)

"While we were still living on the homestead mother was not very well and Father took us three girls (Flora, Hettie, and Mable) for a ride one Sunday over to the Sweed settlement. Another Sunday he took us up to Holdridge. A lot of men and mule teams were working and and using scrapers like the ones they used to move dirt with. They were putting the railroad through. I well remember. Ernie was a baby and I guess he took us so Mother could rest. I remember though, well, the men working. We did not see so many things in those days so we remembered it."

"Another time he took all of us but Ernie to Orleans to a circus on the 4th of July. The Andersons had moved to town and had invited us to come and stay all night. It may have been just us three girls, but Ernie stayed home with Mother. She was expecting Baby Ina at anytime. The part I remember is sleeping on the floor. There was a whole row of us. The next morning I could not find one of my stockings, a big loss in those days. I don't remember how I got by, but I was terribly upset. That was the first time I had been in town."

"Another time they were having a lodge dance in Orleans, Woodmen of the World - Father belonged and had $2000 invested in it. Women were to wear calico dresses. Father brought home the material for mother's. It was a sort of grey with a red crescent shaped figure and little tiny white flecks. The Andersons still lived in the country and their two boys and a girl were a little older than us kids, even my brothers. They left us all at our place. Ernie was the youngest and us girls took him up to the out house so he would not see them leave. There were six of us(Balises) and three of them(Andersons), some sod house full. We thought we saw a tramp coming down the road and we were scared. We all got into the house and shut the door. Then we piled the table and chairs against the door and went back into the boys room and hid so the tramp could not see us through the window. We imagined we could hear him banging around the house. We didn't dare stir for a long time. When we finally ventured out we could not see hide nor hair of him. It's the only time I can remember them leaving us kids. Mother was always home with us."

"(The school) was also built of sod. (It) had no desks or chairs or blackboard, (only) a bench with no back. (You sat) with your books and slate beside you and a rag to wash the slate with. There was no out house. You had to go out back or down to the draw - the foot of a deep ravine. There was a big pot-bellied stove. I can't remember what they used for fuel or if they even had school in severe weather. I know there were times though when the draws were full of snow so I guess they did. We went to the closest neighbor to the schoolhouse, the Gilcrests, a quarter mile away to get water by the pailfull. It took two to carry it. We had one dipper, one wash pan, and one towel. Believe it or not we lived through it and did not have any more colds or sickness than they do today. I can see Father and Mother yet with a spoon and candle giving us something for a cough or cold. (They) always put a cold compress on our throat and wrapped it good to make it sweat."

"My uncle, mother's sister's husband, taught the school at one time. (This would be Junius Lamson.) He was Pearl and Trella's father. But the one I remember best in the sod schoolhouse was Jessie Patterson. Her home was in Orleans and she boarded at our house when school was in session."

" After we moved to town the two boys stayed on the homestead with a hired man Father had had for a long time. I only remember him by "Shorty." (On the 1880 census, a hired man, Aleck Preston, age 21, is living with the Balis family.) We girls went to school in town. I think when school started the boys came in town, for I know they went to school too. It was a two story brick building divided into 4 rooms. The 1st room teacher was Miss Poor, 2nd room Miss Muchmore, the 3rd room Mrs. Treat, the 4th room was for the upper grades taught by the principal, Mr. Nicolas. Each room had more than one grade."

"When Ina was born Father took Flo, Mabel, and I to a neighbor by the name of Gleason. They had two children who went to our school, Clyde and a girl. We stayed all night and most of the next day til they came for us. Mother's sister, Aunt Hettie (Lamson), came to the door and said, 'I have a surprise for you. You have a new baby sister.' I can remember seeing a man with a black bag come out of the house, so perhaps that was when sister was born in May (1884) and passed away in November of the same year. We older ones were up at the sod schoolhouse, not far, just from one little knoll across the creek to the top of another, our house on one, the schoolhouse on the other. Father came out and called to us to come home, that little Ina had died. That was the first time I had ever encountered death. I can see her yet in her little white casket with a little white cashmere pleated gown on and little white button chrysanthemums in around her. I never smell them that I don't remember. She was buried in Orleans Cemetery in the spring. We all gathered wild white morning glories and made wreaths for her grave. Mother never got over Ina's death. (Ina) had convulsions and died before they could get a doctor."

"In the fall of 1885 or the early spring of 1886 Father bought a frame house in Orleans and moved Mother to town where she could have more care and comforts. But she was moved on a bed in the back of a spring wagon. She was never up and around again. She died July 4, 1886. I have never gotten over missing her. She was a wonderful woman and had many accomplishments. (She did) considerable writing, both prose and poetry. (She did) lovely pen and ink drawings and sketches. Out on the homestead she got the early settlers to join a literary society. (They) would meet at the sod schoolhouse with benches to sit on and debate questions and topics of that day and have children recite and take part. How she done it with her family and home, I will never know."

" After Mother died in July Grandma Balis and Grandfather stayed with us for a short time. Finally, it was too much for them and they bought a place just over the fence from a Mr. & Mrs. Davis. Father hired a widow with one small boy to keep house for him and us six children."

" Being a deputy sheriff, (Father) was sent down into Kansas to catch some horse thieves. It was cold, wintery weather, January, and he caught a terrible cold and it went into pneumonia. He was bedfast in Kansas, unable to get home for two or three weeks. A friend of the family of long standing, Shorty, went down and brought Dad home. But he had a relapse and passed away Feb 22, 1887 (In "Thoughts and Memories over the Years" p. A52 Hettie says the friend who went down to Kansas to get their father was 'Mr. Kent. He and Father worked together buying and selling and trading. He went down and brought Father home.')"

"When mother and father were gone we children were all separated. Grandpa and Grandma Balis then lived in a house close to ours in Orleans, Nebraska. A cousin of father's, Mary Frary Reasoner of Newton, Iowa and Uncle Frank Derrick of Brodhead, Wisconsin, mother's older brother, came...Sister Flora went to Grandpa and Grandma Derrick in Brodhead, Rob and I to Iowa, Mabel to Uncle Frank. Ernie and brother Frank stayed with Grandfather Balis in Orleans." (We have a photograph of the six orphaned children just before they were all separated. They all, even the girls, have very short hair. I think it may have been because of the fleas and bedbugs that Hettie mentioned earlier.)


That's about all we know of Flora's childhood. When her parents died she was sent back to Wisconsin to live with Grandpa and Grandma Derrick. Mary Derrick Balis's mother, Harriet Boslow, had died in 1871. In 1872 Grandpa Derrick married for a second time to Mary Ann Williams Northrup. It would have been this step-grandma that Flora grew up the rest of the way with. Flora turned 10 years old three days after her mother died and was not yet eleven when her father died. You can imagine how hard that was for her. I lost just my mother when I was nine and had terrible nightmares for years afterwards. Flora lost both parents and then essentially lost all her brothers and sisters on top of it. She probably got to see her sister Mabel as she also went to Brodhead, but not the same household. And Mable, at some point before adulthood, was sent to live with her mother Mary's older brother, Ted Derrick, in Kansas.

The next we know of Flora is when she marries Edmund Stevens - Edmund Stevens had come to Orfordville, Wisconsin from Nova Scotia, Canada in about 1878. He and Flora were married in Brodhead in 1899. Their first two children were born soon after their marriage, Kathryn Harriet on Oct. 24, 1900, and Paul Derrick on May 8, 1902. At that time the little family was living and working on a farm near Brodhead. Flora's sister, Hettie, visited them there and stayed to help while Flora was awaiting the birth of Paul. Here's how Hettie described their daily routine at that time and place.

"When Flo was expecting Paul I went to help her at $1.25 per week. (At this time Hettie was a single mother with a little boy. She was always looking for ways to live and support herself.) I helped Ed milk the cows night and morning. I cared for the chickens, carried water from the wind mill to the house for every use. We did the washing on a board for five of us, also ironing, cooking, housecleaning. We put in a garden and raked and cleaned up the yard. We baked all our own bread and churned our own butter. The extra milk, Ed took to the creamery in Broadhead."

In 1908 with their third baby on the way, Ed and Flora decided to try their luck homesteading in South Dakota. They settled near Redfield, South Dakota, and lived in a sod house just as Flora had done as a small child. It was there that Harold Balis Stevens, our ancestor, was born on August 25, 1908. Apparently life in South Dakota was not quite as wonderful as they had hoped, because in 1914 the family returned to Footville, Wisconsin, where Ed farmed, raising tobacco among other things.

After several more years of farming the family moved to Footville to a house across the street from the school. Ed opened a blacksmith shop in the back of the house and Flora took in roomers, mostly school teachers. One year in Footville there was a terrible epidemic of measles. Soon afterwards, Ed developed leukemia. He died in 1926, only 54 years old. Not long afterwards, Flora pricked her finger with a needle and developed a terrible infection in her right arm. It took a very long time for it to heal and she never had total use of it again.

About this same time Harold developed a disease called recurring erysipelas. Beset with both of these problems, as well as widowhood, Flora and Harold decided to move to Waukegan, Illinois where Kathryn was teaching school. That year was 1929. the year the Great Depression began. Flora bought a big old house right near downtown Waukegan on Utica Street and she took in boarders, mostly school teachers, just as she had done in Brodhead. We can only imagine how difficult it was to get through the depression as a widow with a handicapped arm. But at least she had a reliable livelihood in the boarding house, and the support of her son, Harold, and married daughter, Kathryn, nearby. Her son, Paul, had moved to Idaho. When Harold married one of those school teachers, Flora went to live with her daughter and son-in-law in Oak Park, Illinois.

From Hettie again, "Sister Flo was 75 in July and passed away soon after caused by asthmatic trouble and her heart just could not stand any more. She suffered for many years with severe asthma attacks, very serious ones. It finally wore her out. She died in the hospital in Waukegan. " She died August 8, 1951.

So this is the story of your great-great-grandmother, Flora Lulu Balis. She got to be a pioneer twice. As a small child she went west in a covered wagon. As a young wife she went pioneering a second time, both times living in a sod house. She became a widow at the young age of 50, and had to survive trhe Great Depression on her own and with a bum arm. But she did it and left her family with a female model of American independence and resourcefulness. Here's how you're related to Flora. She married Edmund Stevens and they had a son named Harold Stevens. Harold married Helen White and had Paul Stevens. Paul married Dianne Zimmerman and had Dawne Stevens. Dawne married Jason Pamplin and had...Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky Pamplin! Hooray for Flora Lulu Balis!

Love,
Granny

Footnotes
  1. Stevens, Edmund - obituary (unknown newspaper).

    "Obituary
    Edmund Stevens
    Unknown Newspaper
    Unknown Date
    (Edmund died 10 Apr 1926)

    Funeral Services for the late Edmund Stevens were held from the home in this village at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon.

    A large assemblage of relatives, neighbors and friends congregated to pay their last tribute of respect to one who in life was honored and respected by all who knew him.

    The deceased had been in poor health for the past two years although able to attend to his business affairs, until little more than two weeks ago, when he was stricken with pleurisy which finally developed into what proved to be his fatal illness.

    Edmund Stevens, fourth child of Charles and Catherine Stevens, was born April 9th, 1872 in Lake Mills, Nova Scotia, and came with his parents to Wisconsin when he was 8 years old.They located in Orfordville, where they made their home for a season, going thence to Brodhead, and with the exception of six years spent in the west, he always lived in the vicinity of Brodhead, Orfordville, and Footville. Six years ago he purchased what was known as the old Snyder homestead in this village and gave up farming and engaged in a lucrative business in town, where the family have since made their home, and where he passed away at 2:50 o'clock on the afternoon of Saturday April 10th, being one day over 54 years of age. June 9th, 1899 he was united in marriage with Miss Flora L. Balis. Three children were born to this union, Kathryn Harriet, Paul Derrick and Harold Balis all of whom were present when the end came. Beside the above mentioned there also survive three sisters: Mrs. Ina Dedrick, Mrs. Alice Oliver, Brodhead, and Mrs. Anna Hutzel, Iowa, and two brothers: Addison Stevens, Idaho, and Calvin Stevens, Montana, besides otheer relatives and many friends.

    Twenty-nine years ago he united with the Methodist Episcopal church in Brodhead and has always lived a consistent Christian life. When he came to reside in this locality his membership was transferred to the local Methodist church of which he was a regular attendant. He was present for church service for the last time the evening of March 28th, although at that time far from being well.

    Mr. Stevens was a charter member of Odd Fellows of Orfordville, the W. O. W. and the Equity Fraternal Union. He was much interested and very active in all civic affairs and for six years had been a member of the Commercial Club and the Fire Department. Edmund was a good man and will be missed in the church, in the home and in social and business circles, yet, surely, His is the better part and for his sake we should say, "Thy will be done."

    Rev. D. M. Maynard, pastor of the local M. E. church delivered the funeral sermon. Rev. and Mrs. Eldred Charles furnished the song service. Internment was in Greenwood Cemetery, Brodhead. The I. O. O. F. of Orfordville who attended in a body conducting services at the grave. The pall-bearers were all members of that organization.

    Among the out-of-town relatives who attended were Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Dedrick, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Oliver, Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Derrick, Harry Lang, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Shaff, Mrs. Marvin Green all of Brodhead. Among out-of-town friends aside from those whose names were not learned were Miss Helen Beckwith and Mr. McCord, Milwaukee; Mrs. Maria Howe, Miss Ida Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Egan, Glen Howe, Orfordville; Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Stair, Mrs. Libby Holcomb, Mrs. Loudon Blackburn, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Green, J. McNair and Elmer Dedrick, Brodhead; Mr. and Mrs. Ben Burcalow, Monroe; Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Strang and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Snyder of Janesville.".

  2. Stevens Blanchard Kathryn-notes from interview, Stevens, H.
  3. Karen Farmer<farmer7455@hotmail.com>, Langille Family Database.
  4. Census, Federal - 1880 - Rock Co., WI, Village of Orfordville (ED # 198), Ancestry p. 3 of 4.
    (5 Jun 1880)

    Dwelling # 82 Household # 82

    Minard, Amos age 69 Farmer VT VT VT
    Abigail 60 wife NH NH NH
    Stevens, Chas 48 Farm Laborer cannot read or write Nova Scotia NS NS
    Catherine 44 wife NS NS NS
    Ina 11 dau attends school NS NS NS
    Edmond 9 son attends school NS NS NS
    Annie 7 dau attends school NS NS NS



    Charles and Catherine's son Addison, 14, is living on the nextdoor farm of B F Gifford as a "hired boy"

    [If Edmund was 9 when this census was taken his birth would be 1871 not 1872. 1871 would be more consistent with his sister Anna's birth in 1872 as show on the SSDI.]

  5. Census, Federal - 1900 - Green Co., WI, city of Brodhead, ED # 120, sheet # 5, line 43.
    (1 Jun 1900)

    Line 43 Clinton St. Dwelling # 128 Household # 133

    Stevens, Edmund head b. Apr 1872 m. 1 yr NS NS NS nat 1875 25yr ago occ: blacksmith r h
    Flora L. wife Jul 1876 1 WI WI WI

  6. Census, Federal - 1920 - Rock Co., WI, town of Footville - ED# 99, sheet #2, A p 3 of 8.

    Line 16 Dwelling # 28 Household # 28

    Stevens, Edmund head OM 48 m n yr? NS NS NS blacksmith
    Flora L. wife 44 m WI WI WI
    Catherine H dau 19 s WI WI WI
    Paul D son 17 s WI WI WI
    Harold B son 11 s WI WI WI
    Dobrow, Jessie boarder 27 s WI WI WI none
    Jones, Brad (?) boarder 19 s WI WI WI store clerk

  7. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986), p. 493.

    Stevens was a partner in Bartlett & Co., well-known carriage makers. The factory was located on West Third Avenue in Brodhead.

  8. Census, Federal - 1910 - Jasper Co, Iowa, Palo Alto, Dist 35 Ancestry p. 17 of 21.

    Line 5 Dwelling 195 Household 195

    Stevens, Edward Head age 38 m1 10yrs Can/Eng Can/Eng Can/Fr Occ: Farmer-general
    Flora L. wife 32 m1 10 3 ch born/ 3 living WI WI WI
    Kathryn dau 9 WI Can/Eng WI
    Paul D. son 8 WI Can/Eng WI
    Harold son 1 6/12 SD Can/Eng WI

  9. Census, Canadian - 1871 - Nova Scotia, Colchester, Upper Londonderry, per Colchester Historical Society website.

    Upper Londonderry Family # 25

    Stevens, Mary age 58
    Charles 39 - Farmer
    Addison 5
    Catherine 34
    Jennie 2
    Calvin 4

  10. Stevens, Edmund - obituary (unknown newspaper).

    [according to 1880 census and births of siblings I believe birth should be 1871.]

  11. Stevens Blanchard Kathryn-notes from interview.
  12. Balis,Flora- Obituary (unknown newspaper).
  13. Census, Federal - 1900 - Green Co., WI, city of Brodhead, ED # 120, ancestry 9 of 23.

    Line 43 Clinton St. Dwelling # 128 Household # 133

    Stevens, Edmund head b. Apr 1872 m. 1 yr NS NS NS nat 1875 25yr ago occ: blacksmith r h
    Flora L. wife Jul 1876 1 WI WI WI

  14. Hettie Balis Carden, Memories of my Life - Book One (unpublished).
  15. Hettie Balis Carden, Thoughts and Memories over the Years (unpublished).
  16. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.
  17. Census, Federal - 1920 - Rock Co., WI, town of Footville - ED# 99, sheet #2, Ancestry p. 3 of 8.

    Line 16 Dwelling # 28 Household # 28

    Stevens, Edmund head OM 48 m n yr? NS NS NS blacksmith
    Flora L. wife 44 m WI WI WI
    Catherine H dau 19 s WI WI WI
    Paul D son 17 s WI WI WI
    Harold B son 11 s WI WI WI
    Dobrow, Jessie boarder 27 s WI WI WI none
    Jones, Brad (?) boarder 19 s WI WI WI store clerk

  18. Census, Federal - 1930 - Rock Co, WI, Janesville, Dist. 35; Ancestry p. 25 of 48.

    Line 45 788 S. Main St. Dwelling # 317 Household # 340

    Stevens, Flora Head R $48/mo no radio age 53 wd WI WI WI occ: none
    Harold son 21 s SD NS WI salesman - grocery store
    Kess, Benjamin Roomer 30 S Mo MO MO laborer - Chevrolet motor co.

  19. Census, Federal - 1910 - Jasper Co, Iowa, Palo Alto, Dist 35 Ancestry p. 17 of 21.

    Line 5 Dwelling 195 Household 195

    Stevens, Edward Head age 38 m1 10yrs Can/Eng Can/Eng Can/Fr Occ: Farmer-general
    Flora L. wife 32 m1 10 3 ch born/ 3 living WI WI WI
    Kathryn dau 9 WI Can/Eng WI
    Paul D. son 8 WI Can/Eng WI
    Harold son 1 6/12 SD Can/Eng WI

  20. Stevens, Flora Balis - Obituary (Janesville Gazette (WI) - unknown date).
  21. International Genealogical Index of North America.
  22. Census, Federal - 1920 - Rock Co., WI, town of Footville - ED# 99, sheet #2, A 3 of 8.

    Line 16 Dwelling # 28 Household # 28

    Stevens, Edmund head OM 48 m n yr? NS NS NS blacksmith
    Flora L. wife 44 m WI WI WI
    Catherine H dau 19 s WI WI WI
    Paul D son 17 s WI WI WI
    Harold B son 11 s WI WI WI
    Dobrow, Jessie boarder 27 s WI WI WI none
    Jones, Brad (?) boarder 19 s WI WI WI store clerk

  23. Census, Federal - 1910 - Jasper Co, Iowa, Palo Alto, Dist 35 Ancestry p. 17 of 21.

    Line 5 Dwelling 195 Household 195

    Stevens, Edward Head age 38 m1 10yrs Can/Eng Can/Eng Can/Fr Occ: Farmer-general
    Flora L. wife 32 m1 10 3 ch born/ 3 living WI WI WI
    Kathryn dau 9 WI Can/Eng WI
    Paul D. son 8 WI Can/Eng WI
    Harold son 1 6/12 SD Can/Eng WI

  24. Kathryn Blanchard to Dianne Stevens - Letter I - about 1973.
  25. Kathryn Blanchard to Dianne Stevens - Letter II - about 1973.
  26. Balis,Flora- Obituary (unknown newspaper).
  27. Census, Federal - 1930 - Larimer Co, Colorado, Precinct #34, Roll T626_244, P. 3A, Image 0825.
    (7 Apr 1930)
  28. Census, Federal - 1920 - Rock Co., WI, town of Footville - ED# 99, sheet #2, A 3 of 8.

    Line 16 Dwelling # 28 Household # 28

    Stevens, Edmund head OM 48 m n yr? NS NS NS blacksmith
    Flora L. wife 44 m WI WI WI
    Catherine H dau 19 s WI WI WI
    Paul D son 17 s WI WI WI
    Harold B son 11 s WI WI WI
    Dobrow, Jessie boarder 27 s WI WI WI none
    Jones, Brad (?) boarder 19 s WI WI WI store clerk

  29. Census, Federal - 1910 - Jasper Co, Iowa, Palo Alto, Dist 35 Ancestry p. 17 of 21.

    Line 5 Dwelling 195 Household 195

    Stevens, Edward Head age 38 m1 10yrs Can/Eng Can/Eng Can/Fr Occ: Farmer-general
    Flora L. wife 32 m1 10 3 ch born/ 3 living WI WI WI
    Kathryn dau 9 WI Can/Eng WI
    Paul D. son 8 WI Can/Eng WI
    Harold son 1 6/12 SD Can/Eng WI

  30. Census, Federal - 1940 - Malheur Co., Oregon, Cairo, p. 11 of 14.

    Household # 105 value of home $600 lives on Farm

    Stevens, Paul head M W age 37 M sch: H-2 b:WI 1935 Res:same farmer OA income:$100 other:Y
    Dorothy E. wife F W 30 M H-2 IL
    Rosemary dau 13 6 WI
    Edmund P son 11 5 WI
    Lonabelle dau 9 2 CO
    Harold G son 6 CO

  31. C. C. Stevens, Family Source, email.
    (15 Jan 2014)

    the farmhouse just out of Jerome.- Paul and
    Dorothy's. When they quit farming, they moved into Jerome in a trailer park
    and Paul worked for a seed company for quite a few years.

  32. Social Security Death Index.
  33. Obituary, unknown newspaper.

    Paul D. Stevens

    Paul D. Stevens, 83, of Jerome died at the Wood River Convalescent Center in Shoshone March 8.
    He was born May 8, 1902 in Wisconsin. He married Dorothy Schlink in February 1927, and moved to Longmont, Colo., where he farmed for six years. They moved to Ontario, Ore., and then to Twin Falls, where he continued farming. He also worked for Northrup King and Rudy Patrick Seed Compoanies, and for the Jerome Bean Growers Associaiton.
    He farmed in Jerome for 20 years until retiring in 1965 and traveled and worked part time for the seed companies. He served in the U.S. Army, and was a member of St. Jerome's Catholic Chruch of Jerome. He was an active member of the Jerome County Democratic Central Committee and Sugar Loaf Grange.
    Surviving are his wife, Dorothy Stevens of Shoshone; two sons, Paul E. Stevens of Moses Lake, Wash., and Harold G. Stevens of Preston; two daughters, Rosemary Sagaberd, of Portland Ore.; and Lona Larsen of McCall; 13 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by one brother and one sister.
    Rosary was recited Monday at St. Jerome's Catholic Church and Mass of the Christian burial was celebrated Tuesday at St. Jerome's Church with Father Bill Taylor as celebrant. Burial was in the Jerome Cemetery.
    The family suggests memorials to the Wood River Convalescent Center and those may be left at Bergin Funeral Chapel.

  34. Dianne Z. Stevens, P&D Stevens Family History.
  35. White, Helen Frances- Notes from Personal Interview by Dianne Z. Stevens.
  36. Stevens, Harold - obituary (unknown newspaper).
  37. Census, Federal - 1920 - Rock Co., WI, town of Footville - ED# 99, sheet #2, A 3 of 8.

    Line 16 Dwelling # 28 Household # 28

    Stevens, Edmund head OM 48 m n yr? NS NS NS blacksmith
    Flora L. wife 44 m WI WI WI
    Catherine H dau 19 s WI WI WI
    Paul D son 17 s WI WI WI
    Harold B son 11 s WI WI WI
    Dobrow, Jessie boarder 27 s WI WI WI none
    Jones, Brad (?) boarder 19 s WI WI WI store clerk

  38. Census, Federal - 1930 - Rock Co, WI, Janesville, Dist. 35, Ancestry p. 25 of 43.

    Line 45 788 S. Main St. Dwelling # 317 Household # 340

    Stevens, Flora Head R $48/mo no radio age 53 wd WI WI WI occ: none
    Harold son 21 s SD NS WI salesman - grocery store
    Kess, Benjamin Roomer 30 S Mo MO MO laborer - Chevrolet motor co.

  39. Census, Federal - 1910 - Jasper Co, Iowa, Palo Alto, Dist 35 Ancestry p. 17 of 21.

    Line 5 Dwelling 195 Household 195

    Stevens, Edward Head age 38 m1 10yrs Can/Eng Can/Eng Can/Fr Occ: Farmer-general
    Flora L. wife 32 m1 10 3 ch born/ 3 living WI WI WI
    Kathryn dau 9 WI Can/Eng WI
    Paul D. son 8 WI Can/Eng WI
    Harold son 1 6/12 SD Can/Eng WI

  40. Census, Federal 1940, Waukegan, Lake, Illinois.

    Name: Harold Stevens
    Age: 31
    Estimated Birth Year: abt 1909
    Gender: Male
    Race: White
    Birthplace: South Dakota
    Marital status: Married
    Relation to Head of House: Head
    Home in 1940: Waukegan, Lake, Illinois
    Map of Home in 1940: View Map
    Street: Sherman Pl
    House Number: 204
    Farm: No
    Inferred Residence in 1935: Waukegan, Lake, Illinois
    Residence in 1935: Same Place
    Resident on farm in 1935: No
    Sheet Number: 2A
    Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 39
    Occupation: Accountant
    House Owned or Rented: Rented
    Value of Home or Monthly Rental if Rented: 45
    Attended School or College: No
    Highest Grade Completed: High School, 4th year
    Hours Worked Week Prior to Census: 42
    Class of Worker: Wage or salary worker in private work
    Weeks Worked in 1939: 52
    Income: 1700
    Income Other Sources: No
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members: Name Age
    Harold Stevens 31
    Helen Stevens 29

  41. Wisconsin, Green Co., - Marriages before 1907, vol. 6, p. 423.
    (6 Jun 1899)

    [copy in files of D.Z. Stevens]

Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016