Husband: John Charles Balis (1 2 3 4 5 6 7)
Born: 18 Jul 1848 in Orfordville, Rock Co., WI
Married: 20 Apr 1872
Died: 21 Feb 1887 in Orleans, NE
Father: Thomas Jefferson Balis
Mother: Mary Malvina Ewers
Spouses:
Wife: Mary Lorinda Derrick (9 10 11)
Born: 18 Mar 1853 in Spring Grove Twsp, Green Co. WI
Died: 04 Jul 1886 in Orleans, NE
Father: Franklin H. Derrick
Mother: Harriet A. Boslow
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Franklin Thomas Balis (13 14 15 16 17 18)
Born: 06 Mar 1873 in Spring Grove, Green Co., WI (19)
Died: about 1944 (20)
Spouses: Florence Sarah Allison; Bessie Harriman
02 (M): Robert H. Balis (21 22 23)
Born: 08 Sep 1874 in Clarence, Spring Grove Twsp, Green Co, WI
Died: 1938
Spouses: Ella Maud Stevens; Odessa Grace Efnor
03 (F): Flora Lulu Balis (24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31)
Born: 07 Jul 1876 in Brodhead, Green Co, WI (32 33)
Died: 08 Aug 1951 in Waukegan, Lake, IL
Spouses: Edmund Stevens
04 (F): Hettie B. Balis (34 35 36 37 38 39 40)
Born: 27 Oct 1878 in Clarence, Spring Grove Twsp, Green Co, WI
Died: 07 Feb 1982 in Fresno, CA
Spouses: Duff Livingston; Bill Houston Cardin
05 (F): Mabel M. Balis (41 42 43 44 45 46)
Born: 19 Aug 1880 in Orleans, Harlan Co., NE
Died: 04 Jun 1907 in Patrolia, TX
Spouses: William Burrell Walker
06 (M): Ernest Earl Balis (47)
Born: 29 Jun 1882 in Orleans, Harlan Co., NE
Died: 17 Mar 1958 in Magnolia Twsp, Rock Co, Wi
Spouses: Hattie Mathilda Bush
07 (F): Ina Maude Balis (48)
Born: 03 Jul 1884
Died: 20 Nov 1884
Spouses:
Additional Information

John Charles Balis:

Buried: OrleansCemetery, Orleans, Harlan Co., NE plot 1/3/132 8

Notes:

John Charles Balis
1848 – 1887
Spring Grove, Wisconsin – Orleans, Nebraska

July 24, 2001
Dear Sarah, Hannah, and Tim,

This is the story of John Balis, another one of your ancestors that was in the Civil War. John was another of your great-great-great-grandfathers. See if You can figure out how many great-great-great grandfathers you had.

John C. Balis was born on July 18, 1848 at Brodhead, Wisconsin. He was the eldest son of Thomas Jefferson Balis and Mary Ewers Balis. In August of 1864 he enlisted into Company G of the thirteenth Wisconsin Veteran Infantry from Spring Valley, Wisconsin, along with uncles, Henry Balis, Abraham Balis, Luther Balis, and good friend Henry Frary. John was not very old. Can you figure out how old he was? Luther died 16 June 1864 at Claysville, Alabama, of disease.

The main work of the thirteenth infantry was to protect the lines of communication for the Union Army in Tennessee, Kentucky, and northern Alabama, like rail lines and telegraph lines. They didn’t fight in many battles but the work they did was very important. They were in a few battles though. These were at Huntsville, AL, Decatur, GA, and Paint Rock Bridge, AL. At the battle of Paint Rock Bridge John was taken prisoner. He was mustered out of the Thirteenth in May 1865, seven months before the unit was disbanded.

On April 20, 1872 John married Mary Derrick, a beautiful and brilliant young woman of 19 years. They lived in the town of Clarence in Spring Grove Township (near Brodhead). There they had 4 children, Frank, Robert, Flora (your great-great-great-grandmother), and Hettie.

In the spring of 1878 they decided to homestead in Nebraska. John’s parents also homesteaded in Nebraska, but I don’t know if that was before or after John and Mary went. So here they go to Nebraska. There were no roads or railroads going there, so they packed up their belongings and drove in a covered wagon. They stopped in Iowa at the home of John’s cousin, Mary Frary Reasoner, and there they washed, repacked, and replenished their supplies. Then they went on to Nebraska where they settled 10 miles north of Orleans, in Harlan County. At first they lived in a house they dug into the earth. Later John built a very nice house of sod. He made it with bricks of earth that he dug from the prairie. The dirt was held together by the huge strong roots of the prairie plants. There they built a very nice farm. They had 180 acres of land, cattle, hogs, and Plymouth Rock fowl. Here are some of the plants they grew in their garden. They had apple trees, strawberries, raspberries, dewberries, gooseberries, currants, Twinnings famous blackberries, pie plant (rhubarb), asparagus, horse radish, corn, potatoes, etc. Besides the farm John made some money buying and selling real estate. The children attended a little sod schoolhouse. They sat on benches with no backs with their slates and readers beside them.

Three more children were born to John and Mary in Nebraska. They were Mabel, Ernie Earl, and Ina Maude. Ina, born in 1884, only lived for four months. Two girl cousins of Ina’s died that same year.

Meanwhile, Mary was developing a terrific case of Tuberculosis, Consumption they called it in those days. Her husband, John, moved the family into the town of Orleans in June of 1886 so that Mary could have better medical care, but it was of no use. Mary died on July 4, 1886 at the age of 33.

John was not too well himself. His wife reported in a letter several weeks before she died that John coughed a good deal and had little strength. John was a Deputy Sheriff for Harlan County. In February of 1887, only seven months after his wife’s death, John was sent out to track some horse thieves who had escaped over the state line into Kansas. About 150 miles from home he came down with pneumonia. He managed to get back to a railroad where a friend came and brought him back to Orleans. He died 4 days later leaving 6 orphan children. What happened to them is a whole ‘nother story.

So here is the story of your great-great-great grandfather that went away to the Civil War as a teenager and became a prisoner of war. He married a local beauty, homesteaded in Nebraska, fathered seven children, was a deputy sheriff, developed consumption and died much too young leaving six orphans.

Here's how we're related to John C. Balis: John and Mary had Flora. Flora Balis grew up, married Edmund Stevens, and had Harold. Harold grew up, married Helen White (Nana), and had Paul. Paul grew up, married me, and had your mom. Your mom grew up, married your dad, and had guess who?

So Hooray for John Charles Balis!

I think that’s all the Civil War veterans I know about in our family.

Lots of Love

Granny

Mary Lorinda Derrick:

Cause of Death: TB

Buried: 06 Jul 1886, Orleans Township Cemetery, Orleans, NE 12

Notes:

Mary Lorinda Derrick
1853 – 1886
Spring Grove, Wisconsin – Orleans, Nebraska


January 2004

Dear Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky,

Today I am writing to you about a very special lady in your family tree. She was your great great great grandmother.

Mary was the third of seven children born to Franklin H. and Harriet Derrick, a highly respected Spring Grove farm family, on March 18, 1853, southwest of Brodhead. She attended the first log school in the area. Later, she went to high school in Brodhead. Her obituary described her in her school years thus, "Quick to learn, full of young life and ambition, she was not only an apt scholar, but the life and center of every group in which she mingled."

After her graduation from high school, her mother died. Mary became the housekeeper for her father and younger siblings until her marriage to John C. Balis on November 18, 1846. They lived in Spring Grove, in the little village of Clarence, until the spring of 1878 when they set off in a covered wagon with their 4 small children, Frank, Robert, Flora, and baby Hettie, to become homesteaders in Harlan County, Nebraska.

Their first home in Nebraska was a dugout. There weren't many trees in Nebraska so folks had to use what materials were available to build their homes. A dugout was a type of home dug into the bank of a river. Theirs had one room. Later on they built a larger dugout with two rooms and used the first one as a barn. Later still they built a good sod house. A sod house was made with big chunks of dirt and roots dug out of the Prairie. Prairie roots go so deep and thick that a square of soil with all those roots in it actually make a pretty good brick. And a few weeks before Mary died they moved to a frame house in the town or Orleans.

Mary's daughter Hettie wrote quite a bit about life in Nebraska. She says that through it all they had to contend with bedbugs and fleas, no matter how hard they worked at trying to get rid of them. Surely a dugout or even the sod house was hard on Mary's developing TB. And yet through it all she was a bright light in the community. I think her spirit is captured by daughter Hettie in tfollowing excerpt from her "Memories of my Life" P. 32 & 33B.

" In the fall of 1885 or the early spring of 1886 Father bought a frame house in Orleans and moved Mother to town where she could have more care and comforts. But she was moved on a bed in the back of a spring wagon. She was never up and around again. She died July 4, 1886. I have never gotten over missing her. She was a wonderful woman and had many accomplishments. (She did) considerable writing, both prose and poetry. (She did) lovely pen and ink drawings and sketches. Out on the homestead she got the early settlers to join a literary society. (They) would meet at the sod schoolhouse with benches to sit on and debate questions and topics of that day and have children recite and take part. How she done it with her family and home, I will never know."

Two children were born in Nebraska, Mabel in 1880, and Ernest in 1882. Then in 1884 baby Ina May was born and lived only four months. The infants death was very hard on Mary. Her daughter Hettie thinks she never did recover. Following are several poems she wrote about the death of Ina May.

God looking down from heaven
Saw our Ina, sweet and fair.
'She is too pure for earth,' He said,
'I'll take her to my care.'
And while we grieve that God should take
The treasure He had given
Her tiny hands still hold the charm
To draw our souls to heaven."


Within the space of a few months Mary and each of her two older brothers had lost a baby girl. Here is a
verse written by Mary Derrick Balis on the death of three little girl Derrick cousins between May and November1884.

"To the Memory of little Susie, May, and Ina - by One who Loved them all

Twas in a garden where bright flowers bloom
And noxious weeds forever were upspringing.
The air was heavy with sweet perfume
But poisonous breaths the weeds were ever bringing.

Three lily buds upon their parent stems
Received the gardeners ever watchful care.
He cherished as misers do their gems
And sheltered them from each rude breath of air.

And as he watched each petal, pure, unfold,
He loved them more with each discovered grace,
Until he thought, No other hand more bold
Must pluck my flowers from their growing place.

I must at least have one. Which shall it be?
The one half open with its pearly leaves
Half hiding, half disclosing, promises to me
That makes its plucking sore to grieve?

But should I leave it - that I cannot do.
I must have one. He broke it from its stem
Then turning, gazed upon the other two.
"I must have all!" he cried. "I must have them!"

"The one almost a lily bloom
The one a tiny bud, so fair and sweet."
He left the garden all in the deepest gloom
And took his treasure to the Master's feet.

"Master, behold these lovely buds I bring.
They were too pure and fair to bloom on earth.
Here in your garden all the year is spring
And here of loving care there is no dearth.

On earth rude storms must sometimes near them come.
Perhaps the tempest finds them in its track.
I love my flowers. 'Tis why I bring them home.
I love them so, I would not take them back.

Though I shall miss them and shall often weep
Still this will comfort me thru future years.
I know the Master safe my buds will keep
And in his own good time will dry my tears."

Mary wrote many poems. Here is one she wrote when Grandma Balis, her husband's grandmother, died.

To the Memory of "Grandma Balis"
Died Dec. 19, 1881, aged 80 years.

Straightened at last the crippled limbs,
Folded in rest the weary hands,
Another angel near God's throne,
Happiest of all the angel band.

Weary, and faint, and sick, below,
Yet waiting with patience the Master's will;
Wondering why others were called to go,
While she, so willing, should linger still.

Full of good works, her simple life,
Full of firm faith, her trusting heart;
Her gentle words disarmed all strife.
And took from the bitterest wound its smart.

The Lord was her comfort, her strength, her trust,
Her "Rock of Refuge" in time of need,
Tho' the poor, weak body will crumble to dust,
She leaned, we know, on no broken reed.

And we feel she has gone to her sure reward
In heaven, where "The ransomed and angels be,"
For "Blessed are they who die in the Lord,"
And we truly can say, Of such was she.

M. L. Balis
Orleans Nebraska
Jan. 9th, 1882


Here is a poem she wrote for the Orleans paper. Bittersweet was her pen name.

Resting Hours

by Bittersweet

The hour has come, the evening hour,
The one of all I love the best,
When quiet reigns with subtle power,
And mind and hands, alike may rest.

In restful sleep the children lay.
Each snugly nestled in his place,
And lines of care formed through the day,
This resting hour must new erase.

Let every care be now forgot,
I'll simply rest, and dream, and think,
Life's toil and worry reach me not,
A cup unadorned, but sweet, I drink.

I wander through green fields where none
Can see the wonders that I see,
Where bloom the flowers, and shines the sun
But only bloom and shine for me.

No other hand may pluck the flowers,
No other eyes may see the light,
But in the evening, resting hours,
I see this scene so fair and bright.

I sit beside soft flowing streams,
And weave sweet fancies, weird and rare,
I sing with ease, of unknown themes,
And laurel blossoms deck my hair.

And when my resting hour is o'er,
I wake refreshed and full of hope,
I find life's burdens less a bore,
With daily care I'm strong to cope.

So while I journey on life's way
And pluck alike both thorns and flowers,
I'll thank my God that every day,
He gives to me these resting hours.


The following letter was written by Mary to Belle Moore Derrick, wife of Mary's brother, Franklin Derrick, Brodhead. Belle and Frank were one of the three couples of Derrick siblings that lost a baby girl during 1884. Sue Derrick lived from November 1883 to May 1884. The Hettie mentioned is Mary's younger sister, mother of Pearl, who lives nearby in Nebraska.

"Orleans, Nebraska January 1st 1885
Dear Sister Belle!
It is New Year's night, and though I cannot myself say "A Happy New Year" just now, still I will wish that this tender New Year may prove less sorrowful than the cruel old one has been for us all. May our wounds be healed and no new ones come to us. What a year it has been. Why! Oh Why! is it Hettie lives in constant dread. She feels as though our girl babies all are to be called home. Three little white doves have flown from earth to heaven. Belle, I can almost see them there with Grandma and Ma. My little Ina girl just as she used to be here, all mused and rumpled, just as she used to talk to me, with her little baby twists and puckers. Sweet little daisy. She was so bright and good, but she has left us and while our hearts ache and our tears flow, still we would not call her back. I know our grief is selfish for it is all for ourselves. We know she is safe. Were we as much so. We grieve for our loss when we should rejoice in her gain.

The holidays passed quietly. The little ones requested that they might go without presents and save theirs for fixing and fencing sister's grave, so Papa gave them the money instead. Hettie took dinner with Mrs. Hunter Christmas. They live near each other. I was over to Hettie's two weeks ago. They were well. Pearl walks and says quite a good many words.

Our children all go to school except Ernie. The teacher boards with us. Then we have such a nice old man John has hired for a year. He helps me ever so much, is a bachelor and knows how to do all kinds of work. He says if I can go home before spring work commences he can keep house. The teacher could board somewhere else, and I hire my washing and ironing done anyway. So if anything happens so we can spare the means I shall try and come. If I don't, I don't know when I ever can. My cough is quite bad again this winter, and I stay at home quite close. We are having real cold weather here now, for about two weeks back. Before that it was beautiful weather. Our first snow came this week.

Poor Tid and Ellen, how we pity them too. It seems as though it must be a fearful blow to them. Sweet little May. Her life's record was pure and brief. You truly say I did not lose all. We do find much to comfort us in our other little ones. We have good children, all of them grow so fast. Frankie is nearly as tall as I am. Robbie is a slow, honest chap, very different from Frank. Frank is very quiet, a great reader and says but little. Skippie (Flora) is such a fat strong little Dutch woman. She is good as gold. Mabel, quick of eye and temper, a little vixen. She is Aunt Hettie's pet. Hettie Belle is slow, good natured and lazy. Ernie is rather spoiled. He was sick so much and since baby went away he has clung close to me and I have babied too much for his own good.

Well, I must stop for this time. You will never know how dear your letter was to me. We know it was true sympathy that called a letter from you or Tid. Good old Tid. He wrote us such a good long letter. I wish I could see you all, but God only knows what the weeks may bring forth. I will write to Frank before long.

With love to all, Your sister, Mollie

Mary did go home to Wisconsin that spring, for a visit.

This following letter from Mary to her husband's sister, Hettie Balis TenEcyk, was written little more than a month before Mary died. It tells about their new home in the town of Orleans.

Orleans, Nebraska May 30th 1886
Dear Aunt Hat TenEcyk - Family -
Guess, no doubt, that I don't write, but oh Aunt Hat, I think the letters I write will be very few.
Perhaps these will be the last lines I shall ever trace to you. If so let them speak all the love and gratitude of a lifetime, for the many acts of kindness you have shown me and mine in the good old days. I am very, very poorly. I don't tell the rest so, but I feel that my days on earth are numbered, and the number few. Unless I should run into lingering consumption which I hope you will all pray may not be. Still, if it is God's will that I should suffer, I hope He will give me strength and grace to submit.

John is down to his father's this week. We have such a nice place in town. Have possession tomorrow. The house is 26x14 upright and 20x 14 wing and two stories all of it. Just think Aunt Hat, it does seem a ____ hard when we were just so we could enjoy the fruits of privation and toil and such splendid schools. A large Free Methodist College and the best of graded schools, such a chance for our boys and girls, and I broke down. John is not a bit well, he coughs a good deal and has but little strength. Still, he keeps knocking around. He sells and trades real estate. We have a splendid little team and a two-seated buggy, 18 head of cattle and some fine hogs. Some nice Plymouth Rock fowls. We had about 8 qts. strawberries last year and a bushel of red raspberries. We will have a good many this year. I hate to leave the place. We have a good many trees growing in a circle, a few apple trees, Dew berries (Mary sent me) gooseberries, a few currants, some of Twinnings' famous blackberries, three kinds of raspberries, pie plant, asparagus,horseradish, etc, etc. So you see we leave a good deal. We have nine kinds of melons planted here, and the best kind of a garden. Lots of sweet corn and potatoes. We have 180 acres here and 160 acres (a grand garden) and our house and three lots in Orleans. If we sell this place it will clear every cent we owe and leave us 160 acres of land and our stock and our place in town free and clear and some cash to handle besides. Do you think that is bad? My, we wouldn't think of selling for less than $2,500. We have been offered $2,000 for it and the place in town is cheap at $1,500. Everybody says it's only a year since it was built. Now, I will say, excuse my paper I found and I had no other and was bound to write.

You wouldn't know the children they are all well and grow so, they are all ready to run for Mama. Little Ernie is just four years old last night, baby Ina would have been 2 the last of July. The children have had me making wreaths of rosebuds, and they have nearly a day (bouquet) to put on sister's grave tomorrow. I wish I could go. I had such a good girl, but her Pa sent for her to come down in Kansas to take land. The one I have now is more wind than work. She talks half the time. But she is much better than no girl and is very kind and loves children. But things don't look like when Ma was doing the work the children say.

Our expenses are over ten dollars a week besides clothes. I pay my girl $2.50 per week and the wash, it makes me nearly sick. John gets me everything in the market. I have California canned fruit all the time, fresh fish, nite again, and beef steak all the time. I have strawberries at 35 cents per box until I got tired of them, and then my doctor bills. But I must stop, my arm is ready to drop off. Only intended to write a few lines. I felt so bad but it is so long since I wrote I couldn't help telling you how we were doing.

John bought a 160 acres while I was home (back in Brodhead) last spring, held it about 8 months and sold it. Cleared $850.00 cash. You see it pays.

Well do write to me a long letter. They cheer me up.

Good-bye, Your loving niece, M.L. Balis

Mary lived barely more than a month after writing that letter, dying on July 4, 1886.

This is the obituary notice that appeared in the Brodhead paper:

"Mrs. Mary Lorinda Derrick Balis
Born: Mar. 18, 1853 Spring Grove Township, Green Co., WI, South of Brodhead
Died: July 4, 1886 Buried: Orleans, Nebraska

“Mary Derrick, the daughter of our townsman, Mr. F. H. Derrick, was born in Spring Grove Township, Green Co., WI, March 18, 1853 and resided there until her marriage. She received her early education in the district school and later attended high school in Brodhead. Quick to learn, full of young life and ambition, she was not only an apt scholar, but the life and center of every group in which she mingled.

“In 1871 she met with the loss of her mother by death, and during the year following she remained in the old home keeping house for her father. In the fall of 1872 she was united in marriage to John C. Balis, and they made their home in Spring Grove township until 1879 when they moved to Harlan County, Nebraska and settled upon a farm about 10 miles north of Orleans. Here she resided until a few weeks previous to her death. Mr. Balis moved into the village of Orleans that his wife might have better care and medical attention. But all that could be done proved unavailing save as it eased her pathway to the tomb.

“In the spring of 1885 Mrs. Balis came here to her old home and spent six or seven weeks amid the scenes and with the friends of her early life. Her health then was not firm, but she looked forward to many years of a helpful happy life. But instead of improving she grew weaker, and for the last three months of her life she was most of the time confined to her bed.

“On Sunday July 4th the worn spirit passed to rest. Besides the bereaved husband, six children, three girls and three boys from four to thirteen years of age remain to mourn the loss of a faithful wife and a fond mother. Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Derrick (Franklin H. and Mary Ann Williams Northrup Derrick) reached their daughters bedside in time to be with her and soothe her by their presence and love in the last hours of her life.

“The funeral was on Tuesday, July 6th at the M.E. Church in Orleans. The services were conducted by Rev. N. F. Kletzing, and the remains were followed to their last resting place by a large concourse of sorrowing and sympathetic friends.

“Here where Mrs. Balis was well known, Where she grew from childhood to womanhood, she needs no eulogy from us. Rarely gifted by nature, she was not only the thrifty housewife and careful home-mother, she was a graceful writer, both of prose and verse. In the first number of Independent Register issued by us and bearing the date may 30, 1879 in a happy, hopeful letter from her, written from Sunday Camp Creek, about twelve miles beyond Sabula ----------. They were on their way to the new home in the new country and the rainbow of hope spanned their sky. Indeed, though some of her latter letters revealed a touch of homesickness, she never ceased to be enthusiastic about Nebraska, both its present and its future. Our last contribution from her pen was the lines in memory of Abbie Farmer Folsom, written when she felt that she too should soon cross the dark river. She was a frequent and welcome contributor to the Harlan County Press published in Orleans, Nebraska and we gladly clip the following tribute from its columns:
'In the death of Mrs. J. C. Balis the Press has lost one of its best friends and most fluent writers, 'Bittersweet', as everyone knew her. Her poetry was generally written for her home paper in Brodhead, Wisconsin, and then has been copied for the Press. Where we knew her best, however, was in the brilliant prose composition to the paper. All readers have missed her during her late sickness and none regret her early death more than the circle of choice friends who so admired her.' "


In addition to her writing, Mary Derrick Balis did some lovely drawings. Two bear special mention.
A pen and ink drawing of Napoleon on horseback was given to Florence Allison, first wife of Mary's son Frank, for her son, Thomas. Another pen and ink drawing of a flowery wreath with Mary's photograph in the middle has the words "For Father" written beneath it. This drawing is now in the possession of Shirley Nyman Harris.

So, dear children, this is the story of one of your great great great grandmothers. She was beautiful and brilliant. She was a good wife and mother and tried with all her heart to live a good Christian life. She lived with great hope and happiness as well as tremendous grief. She was one of our country's pioneer woman. Though everyday she faced dirt and bugs and hard work she still brought to the life of her family and her community the light of learning and the gifted sensitivity of a poet and an artist. I hope you will always remember her.

Here's how we're related to May Lorinda Derrick: Mary was the mother of Flora Balis. Flora was the mother of Harold Stevens. Harold was the father of Paul Stevens. You know him. He's your Grandpa! Paul is the father of Dawne Stevens. Dawne is the mommy of...all four of you!

So Hooray for Mary Lorinda Derrick Balis!

Love,
Granny

(07) Ina Maude Balis:

Buried: Orleans Township Cemetery, Orleans, NE

Footnotes
  1. Nyman, Ina-letter to Dianne Stevens dated 2/26/1984, Balis.
  2. Nyman, Ina - various papers.
  3. Veith, Michele (Ged-com file imported 17 MAR 2002).
  4. Wisconsin State Historical Society - Veterans Museum, Civil War - Certificate of Service.
  5. Census, Federal - 1850 - Rock Co, WI, Spring Valley.
  6. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.

    [This census shows a hired man, Aleck Preston, age 21, living with the family. Thomas J. Balis, 52, is living by himself, next door.]

  7. Shirley Nyman Harris, Various papers copied and sent to DZStevens in August 2003, Letter from Brodhead Independent Register.

    Mr T J Balis gives a few particulars concerning his son's death, Mr. John Balis.

    "Mr. John Balis, when taken ill was aobut 150 miles from home, having gone in performance of his duty as constable to reciover some horses which had been wrongfully hidden away. After a journey of about 100 miles by rail he was compelled to drive across the country, some sixty miles, and taking cold, was attacked by pneumonia. He managed to get back as far as the railroad when his friend, Judge Kent, came for him and took him home to Orleans, reaching there on Thursday, and Mr. Balis died the following Monday morning about 6 o'clock."

    Mr. T. J. Balis reached the place on Wednesday and the funeral services were held on Thursday. As soon as he can settle up both his own and his son's business he will return to Brodhead bringing with him his six orphaned grandchildren. Mr. Balis was a member of the Order of United Workmen, and his children will promptly receive from that association, his insurance of $ 2000.

  8. Nyman, Ina-letter to Dianne Stevens dated 2/26/1984.
  9. Poems by Mary L. Derrick Balis.

    To the Memory of "Grandma Balis"
    Died Dec. 19, 1881, aged 80 years.


    Straightened at last the crippled limbs,
    Folded in rest the weary hands,
    Another angel near God's throne,
    Happiest of all the angel band.


    Weary, and faint, and sick, below,
    Yet waiting with patience the Master's will;
    Wondering why others were called to go,
    While she, so willing, should linger still.

    Full of good works, her simple life,
    Full of firm faith, her trusting heart;
    Her gentle words disarmed all strife.
    And took from the bitterest wound its smart.

    The Lord was her comfort, her strength, her trust,

    Her "Rock of Refuge" in time of need,
    Tho' the poor,weak body will crumble to dust,
    She leaned, we know on no broken reed.

    And we feel she has gone to her sure reward
    In heaven, where "The ransomed and angels be,"
    For "Blessed are they who die in the Lord,"
    And we truly can say, Of such was she.

    M. L. Balis
    Orleans Nebraska
    Jan. 9th, 1882


    RESTING HOURS

    By
    Bittersweet

    The hour has come, the evening hour,
    The one of all I love the best,
    When quiet reigns with subtle power,
    And mind and hands, alike may rest.

    In restful sleep the children lay.
    Each snugly nestled in his place,
    And lines of care formed through the day,
    This resting hour must new erase.

    Let every care be now forgot,
    I'll simply rest, and dream, and think,
    Life's toil and worry reach me not,
    A cup unadorned, but sweet, I drink.

    I wander through green fields where none
    Can see the wonders that I see,
    Where bloom the flowers, and shines the sun
    But only bloom and shine for me.

    No other hand may pluck the flowers,
    No other eyes may see the light,
    But in the evening, resting hours,
    I see this scene so fair and bright

    I sit beside soft flowing streams,
    And weave sweet fancies, weird and rare,
    I sing with ease, of unknown themes,
    And laurel blossoms deck my hair.

    And when my resting hour is o'er,
    I wake refreshed and full of hope,
    lfind life's burdens less a bore,
    With daily care I'm strong to cope.

    So while I journey on life's way
    And pluck alike both thorns and flowers,
    I'll thank my God that every day,
    He gives to me these resting hours.

    "Ina Maude Balis, daughter of John and Mary Derrick Balis, died November 20, 1884. born July 3, 1884, age 3 months and 21 days, buried at Orleans, Nebraska.

    A verse written by her mother, Mary Derrick Balis:

    God looking down from heaven
    Saw our Ina, sweet and fair.
    'She is too pure for earth,' He said,
    'I'll take her to my care.'
    And while we grieve that God should take
    The treasure He had given
    Her tiny hands still hold the charm
    To draw our souls to heaven."



    Verse written by Mary Derrick Balis on the death of three little girl Derrick cousins between May and October 1884.

    "To the Memory of little Susie, May, and Ina - by One who Loved them all

    Twas in a garden where bright flowers bloom
    And noxious weeds forever were upspringing.
    The air was heavy with sweet perfume
    But poisonous breaths the weeds were ever bringing.

    Three lilly buds upon their parent stems
    Received the gardeners ever watchful care.
    He cherished as misers do their gems
    And sheltered them from each rude breath of air.

    And as he watched each petal, pure, unfold,
    He loved them more with each discovered grace,
    Until he thought, No other hand more bold
    Must pluck my flowers from their growing place.

    I must at least have one. Which shall it be?
    The one half open with its pearly leaves
    Half hiding, half disclosing, promises to me
    That makes its plucking sore to grieve?

    But should I leave it - that I cannot do.
    I must have one. He broke it from its stem
    Then turning, gazed upon the other two.
    "I must have all!" he cried. "I must have them!"

    "The one almost a lily bloom
    The one a tiny bud, so fair and sweet."
    He left the garden all in the deepest gloom
    And took his treasure to the Master's feet.

    "Master, behold these lovely buds I bring.
    They were too pure and fair to bloom on earth.
    Here in your garden all the year is spring
    And here of loving care there is no dearth.

    On earth rude storms must sometimes near them come.
    Perhaps the tempest finds them in its track.
    I love my flowers. 'Tis why I bring them home.
    I love them so, I would not take them back.

    Though I shall miss them and shall often weep
    Still this will comfort me thru future years.
    I know the Master safe my buds will keep
    And in his own good time will dry my tears."

  10. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.
  11. Census, Federal - 1870 - GreenCo., Wisconsin, Spring Grove.

    Line 30 Dwelling # 148 Household # 148

    Derrick, F.H. age 46 farmer Real Estate = $15,000 b. NY
    Harriet 48 Canada
    Theodore 22 farmer WI
    Frank 20 in school WI
    Mary 17 in school WI
    Levi 15 in school WI
    Harriet 13 in school WI
    Peter 8 in school WI
    Lorinda 78 NY

  12. Nyman, Ina-letter to Dianne Stevens dated 2/26/1984.
  13. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  14. Stevens, Dianne Z., Stevens Family History.
  15. Hettie Balis Carden, Memories of my Life - Book One (unpublished).
  16. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.
  17. Census, Federal - 1910 - Boulder Co., Colorado, Salina, Ancestry p. 4 of 7.
    (29 Apr 1910)

    Line 51 Dwelling # 52 Family # 53

    Balis, Thomas head age 37 m2 6 yrs WI NY WI occ: retail merchant/groceries OA
    Bessie H. wife 32 m1 6 CO WI WI
    Esther E. dau 5 CO WI CO

  18. Census, Federal - 1920 - Boulder Co., Colorado, Boulder City, Ancestry p. 16 of 35.
    (9 Jan 1920)

    Line 53 662 Concord Ave, Dwelling # 177 Household # 203

    Balis, Thomas F. Head owns/M age 47 WI IL WI occ: Miner/gold mine working on own
    Bessie wife 42 CO NY PA
    Esther E. dau 15 CO WI CO
    Earl W. son 8 CO WI CO
    Westcot, Ethel E. boarder 25 S CO Eng Eng

  19. Veith, Michele (Ged-com file imported 17 MAR 2002).
  20. Hettie Balis Carden, Memories of my Life - Book One (unpublished), p.25B.
  21. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  22. Veith, Michele (Ged-com file imported 17 MAR 2002).
  23. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.
  24. Balis,Flora- Obituary (unknown newspaper).
  25. Census, Federal - 1900 - Green Co., WI, city of Brodhead, ED # 120, ancestry 9 of 23.

    Line 43 Clinton St. Dwelling # 128 Household # 133

    Stevens, Edmund head b. Apr 1872 m. 1 yr NS NS NS nat 1875 25yr ago occ: blacksmith r h
    Flora L. wife Jul 1876 1 WI WI WI

  26. Hettie Balis Carden, Memories of my Life - Book One (unpublished).
  27. Hettie Balis Carden, Thoughts and Memories over the Years (unpublished).
  28. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.
  29. Census, Federal - 1920 - Rock Co., WI, town of Footville - ED# 99, sheet #2, Ancestry p. 3 of 8.

    Line 16 Dwelling # 28 Household # 28

    Stevens, Edmund head OM 48 m n yr? NS NS NS blacksmith
    Flora L. wife 44 m WI WI WI
    Catherine H dau 19 s WI WI WI
    Paul D son 17 s WI WI WI
    Harold B son 11 s WI WI WI
    Dobrow, Jessie boarder 27 s WI WI WI none
    Jones, Brad (?) boarder 19 s WI WI WI store clerk

  30. Census, Federal - 1930 - Rock Co, WI, Janesville, Dist. 35; Ancestry p. 25 of 48.

    Line 45 788 S. Main St. Dwelling # 317 Household # 340

    Stevens, Flora Head R $48/mo no radio age 53 wd WI WI WI occ: none
    Harold son 21 s SD NS WI salesman - grocery store
    Kess, Benjamin Roomer 30 S Mo MO MO laborer - Chevrolet motor co.

  31. Census, Federal - 1910 - Jasper Co, Iowa, Palo Alto, Dist 35 Ancestry p. 17 of 21.

    Line 5 Dwelling 195 Household 195

    Stevens, Edward Head age 38 m1 10yrs Can/Eng Can/Eng Can/Fr Occ: Farmer-general
    Flora L. wife 32 m1 10 3 ch born/ 3 living WI WI WI
    Kathryn dau 9 WI Can/Eng WI
    Paul D. son 8 WI Can/Eng WI
    Harold son 1 6/12 SD Can/Eng WI

  32. Stevens, Flora Balis - Obituary (Janesville Gazette (WI) - unknown date).
  33. International Genealogical Index of North America.
  34. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  35. Stevens, Dianne Z., Stevens Family History.
  36. Veith, Michele (Ged-com file imported 17 MAR 2002).
  37. Round Robin Letter from Hettie to her children, nieces, and nephews dated 9 Jun 1973.
  38. Census, Federal - 1880 - Harlan Co, Nebraska, district 35, Ancestry, p. 2 of 6.
  39. Hettie Balis Carden, Memories of my Life - Book One (unpublished).
  40. Hettie Balis Carden, Thoughts and Memories over the Years (unpublished).
  41. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  42. Stevens, Dianne Z., Stevens Family History.
  43. Veith, Michele (Ged-com file imported 17 MAR 2002).
  44. Nyman, Ina - various papers.
  45. Hettie Balis Carden, Memories of my Life - Book One (unpublished).
  46. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).
  47. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  48. Ibid.

    [Frank gives dates of 1886 which is wrong.]

Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016